4 CX Mistakes to Avoid: Missed Customer Touchpoints

In this four-part series, Matthew Clare discusses four technical mistakes companies make when building their customer experience strategies, and how your business can avoid them. Part 1 focuses on certain customer touchpoints that businesses often overlook when mapping out their customer experience strategy, and what your business should do instead.



From the Video

Hi, I'm Matt Clare, product manager from Mitel's Contact Center Portfolio, and today I wanted to talk to you about some of the technical mistakes that businesses make when they're mapping out a new contact center implementation or building out their customer experience strategy.

We'll start by talking about some of the customer touchpoint mistakes that businesses often make. A lot of companies have been focused on the right things. Things like voice of the customer, understanding their customer journey, so they can really ensure they're providing services how, when and where their customers are looking to be served.

This has led in a rise in digital contact center capabilities around the world. And helped move digital and multimedia contact center capabilities from being a marketing buzzword to really being recognized as a true value and differentiator within the customer experience market.

I've really recognized this from a lot of my travels this year to different contact center customers of ours and different customer experience events where it was really noticeable that you can see a rise in interest in things like Chatbots and artificial intelligence. So companies are now seeing the value of things like email, web chat, SMS and social media interactions and are now looking to more next generational capabilities like Chatbots for example.

So the good news is companies are doing the right thing. They're looking at their customer journey mapping, they're differentiating via self-service and digital media, and they're looking to emerging technologies. But the issue is, a lot of companies are still looking at their digital media contact center capabilities from a really narrow point of view.

Let me expand on that a little bit. The word omnichannel means a lot of different things to companies and vendors around the world. For some, it's as simple as a new term for digital media, multi-media, or multi-channel capabilities. For others, it's all about the customer journey mapping. Understanding how long a customer's been on a website, if that transitioned to a purchase on the backend. The real differentiator for omnichannel, however, is a fundamental recognition by the business that a customer interaction doesn't simply begin and end when a phone rings, or when the phone is hung up.

For example, consider a recent experience I had with my gas company. I rent my hot water tank from my gas company and a few months ago it started to die. So the first thing I did was contact the gas company through a web chat, and asked for some troubleshooting tips and hints in hopes that I could solve this issue myself. A day later, my lukewarm water had now gone fully cold, and it was really clear I needed a new hot water tank. So I got on the phone, called my gas company, and they dispatched a technician to my house who installed a new pump, set it all up, took away my old tank. So you think the interaction is over at this point, correct? Well no, not at all. Two days later, I actually got a follow up self-service survey from the company to make sure that I was happy with their service and that everything was working properly.

In this omnichannel example, my experience didn't start and end with a web chat. It started with a web chat, transitioned to a phone call and ended with an outbound self-survey. This complete, holistic view of end-to-end customer interaction is the definition of omnichannel. And all too often businesses get really caught up in trying to measure and manage the small, minute interactions like the phone call, like the web chat, and only by looking at this holistic view of the omnichannel customer experience can you really understand your customer's journey, and then start looking at how problems are resolved from initial problem, or inquiry, to resolution, or answer.

So as businesses are looking to meet these needs they really need to ensure they don't mistake their omnichannel capabilities with simply digital media capabilities. Digital contact center capabilities are great, but they do not equal omnichannel capabilities. Omnichannel capabilities on the other hand, are made up of smaller voice and digital interactions. Stay tuned for the next video that will look more at some of the technical mistakes businesses can make when they're deploying a new customer experience strategy

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